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GRC Season Review: Pat Moro, Part 2

Image via PMR Motorsports Facebook

For Pat Moro and PMR Motorsports, the 2012 Global Rallycross Championship season represented an uphill battle. Running older equipment on a shoestring budget, positives were few and far between early in the season, especially when the team missed X Games for financial reasons.

But not long after, the No. 59 Subaru WRX STi, the result of PMR’s technical work and the marketing help of Michael Crawford Motorsports, began making strides towards competitiveness. Moro finished 12th in New Hampshire and 11th at Las Vegas, and was fast enough in its first heat race at SEMA to suggest that a main event appearance shouldn’t be too far off.

In the second part of our season review, Moro gives his overall assessment of the season, while also hinting at his 2013 plans:

You finished 16th overall in points, with a couple of strong heat and LCQ performances. Given the limited budget you had to run with, are you satisfied with what you were able to do? Or are you more frustrated that the budget didn’t allow you to be more competitive?

Image via Michael Crawford Motorsports Facebook

I’m not really too satisfied with the performance—I think that we’ve had to be very cautious with everything. It’d be great if we secured a bigger budget moving into next year, that would be the biggest difference. I think that it’s a little rough to say, but we didn’t have the budget to do testing any of the dates before the races. We’d like to secure enough (of a) budget so we can go there a little bit ahead of time and do some. You hear about everybody else doing testing at this place or that place two or three days before the event and we just didn’t have the budget to do that. I think that’s a key part in making us run better.

The other thing is, we really have to look after the equipment with the little budget that we have. And that kind of affects it. You know, with a factory ride, you can pretty much just leave it all hanging out, and then everything’s fixed. If we lose a motor—we have a spare gearbox and stuff, but if we lose a motor, then we’re done for that event. So we have to be very cautious of that. And I think that affected our performance a lot.

I think that the last round we should have been in the main. I felt like we should have been into the main in New Hampshire, but like I said, there were some growing pains that we were going through there. I feel that we’ll be stronger in the future, and a consistent player into the main.

Image via Michael Crawford Motorsports Facebook

We saw a couple of major accidents by other privateer teams in the final two rounds of the season. You’ve said you’re pretty confident with the jump, but did you ever stop for a minute and rethink that in the wake of those incidents?

It’s really never been a problem for me. I just try to look at it as, I have a little bit of experience on motorcycles, so I think once you’re committed to that jump, you have to fully be committed. I would say that those accidents were situations where those guys weren’t completely, fully committed to that jump, and I believe that they somewhat panicked. Once you commit to doing it, you have to be fully committed and just do it.

In my opinion, on the jump, everybody’s so worried about that crucial speed. I don’t think it’s the crucial speed as much as jumping is a feel thing—you try to do it from the seat of your pants. But it’s never really been a concern for me. Maybe I’m not smart enough to think that much ahead! (laughs) But I think the jump is something that we’ve done (for) years and years at X Games, and to me it’s a little bit old hat. It doesn’t mean that we can’t make a mistake on it, everybody can make a mistake, and it’s an unfortunate thing.

I hope those guys recover from it well and it doesn’t deter them from coming back. But for me, you commit to it, you do it, and you don’t think any more about it. The more you think about it, you psyche yourself out.

Image via Michael Crawford Motorsports Facebook

The GRC obviously grew and expanded over the course of the season, and the series looked different in the finale at SEMA than it did in the opener at Charlotte. Overall, how do you think they handled race promotion and safety this year?

I think all the guys at GRC did a really good job with communications this year. What I don’t think everybody remembers is that those guys have a huge job that they’re doing and there’s so much that they need to look after. With everything there’s always growing pains. I think that as far as safety goes, if that refers back to the accidents that have happened this year, the thing is so new that there’s always going to be stuff that’s unforeseen, or that needs to be looked after. They have made adjustments, and I think they’re always looking for adjustments.

But I think when you look at the safety, you look at a European rallycross car, which was never meant to do the jump, or meant to be in the tight confines that we are putting these cars in. I think these cars, with the GRC stuff, will progress, be a little bit stronger, and progress in the safety features of the car. But everybody that’s really had some big crashes has come away—I wouldn’t say unhurt, but for the type of crash that they’ve had, they’ve come away pretty good, in my opinion. I think that they’ve definitely looked at it.

Image via PMR Motorsports Facebook

I think the guys at SMI, when we went to New Hampshire, did a great job of putting on a great show, and I thought they did a pretty good job down there at Texas. And they started to implement the dirt. When we started the season at Charlotte, we didn’t really have any dirt, and we went down to Texas and didn’t have any dirt, but we had the jump. And it’s progressively gotten better every event. And I think the more obstacles that you put in with these cars, you’ll see what they’re really capable of doing. But when we went to Charlotte, you didn’t even see a quarter of what the car can do, compared to later in the season, when they started to show a little bit more of their capabilities and they got to be way more exciting to watch.

Finally, what are your thoughts on the 2013 season? Are you planning to build a new car or bring back this year’s model? What are your thoughts on the schedule for next year with the Global X Games rounds?

Image via Michael Crawford Motorsports Facebook

The Global rounds sound great. There’s still a big question of who’s going and who’s not going. Those dates are approaching very fast. Our plans for next year are, we’re planning to build a new car. We’re still trying to secure the money, the sponsorship to finish the build of the car, we’ve actually already started on the car. I really don’t want to say what kind of car it is at this time, but we have started on a new car. It’s just, if we can secure enough money to complete the car. If that would be ready for the first couple of Global Rallycross (rounds) or not, I’m not sure. It depends on the finances of the whole thing.

But we feel that the current car is too big of a car, too heavy of a car, and the H-pattern gearbox is not going to make it a competitive car. It’s a decent car, but the plans are starting with a new sheet of paper, so to speak, putting the new car together, and making it something that’s very competitive with the Fords.

Pat Moro can be found on Twitter @59moro. PMR Motorsports maintains a Facebook page, Twitter @PMRMotorsports, and website. Michael Crawford Motorsports, which provided a marketing partnership for Moro in the second half of this season, can be found on Facebook here.

—Chris Leone

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